Hello, everyone! Welcome to Nursing Class
Deanna B. Hiott PhD candidate, MSN, RN
HiottD_photo.6.9.16.jpg

~ Too often we give students answers to remember rather than problems to solve.~ Roger Lewin


This wiki has been recognized as a nursing wiki of note by Webicina.com


My name is Deanna Hiott and I am currently completing my doctorate at the Medical University of South Carolina. I originally started this wiki which I named Nursing Class to hold and house my practicum teaching adventures while in graduate school at Charleston Southern University. Then over the next 2 years built it to house all my pediatric classroom materials while I was a nursing instructor at the University of South Carolina Upstate, Mary Black School of Nursing in sunny South Carolina, USA!
I am now an Associate Professor at Anderson University's School of Nursing in Anderson, South Carolina. I continue to work on this and other sites. Enjoy!

I am also a nurse blogger at Nurse's Watch and have had articles published online. Feel free to visit me there and at my other wiki, called Nursing Class 2 , which covers the Fundamentals of Nursing, Geriatrics and Pathophysiology.

Additionally, I started to work on my PhD in 2013 at the Medical University of South Carolina. Since then I have started another wiki to help nursing students who are returning to school. It is not as comprehensive...yet, but when you decide to go back to school check out Nursing Class 3 for helps with graduate studies, research and statistics.

The navigation bar to the right of this text shows all the pages included in the Nursing Class Wiki. The class notes, videos, PowerPoints and case studies are grouped by system.


Thank you
Mrs. Hiott

Why a Nursing Wiki?

Ideally, students need to read and prepare for their day in class ahead of time. This will help assure that they are ready to interact with the material that will be presented.

Hainsworth (2008) depicts a learning pyramid developed by the National Training Laboratories at the Institute for Applied Behavioral Science (n.d.) which shows that reading something usually has a retention rate of 10%, hearing 20%, seeing 30%, seeing and hearing 50%, speaking and/or writing 70% and speaking and doing 90%.

My thoughts are that each time material is repeated and introduced in a different way it adds to the 10% gained from reading. Consequently, additional classroom activities add to the scaffold or building of presented material. This expands the student's knowledge and understanding, which is necessary for critical thinking and application. Lastly, since clinical exposure to these various diagnoses and situations can be limited, the added videos contribute to the nursing students understanding and knowledge of the patient's and families perspectives on the various illnesses and treatments.


If the students read the chapters, then came to class prepared to interact with the material, the teacher briefly reviews the concepts and then has the students interact with the included case studies. The videos represent real families, concepts and dilemmas, they must work together to outline the case and the nursing care it would entail. This would have the students interacting with the material on all levels. The videos lend faces and add feeling to the otherwise dry clinical picture. Lecture could or could not be utilized but the more the students interact with the material the more likely they will remember the material and consequently be equipped to apply it!

Hainsworth, D. (2008). Chapter 12: Instructional materials. In S. B. Bastable (Ed.), Nurse as educator: Principles of teaching and learning for nursing practice (3rd ed., pp. 473-514). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.


Note:
This wiki is the personal property of Deanna B Hiott PhD candidate, MSN, RN. Though I am an educator, the university is not responsible for the content of this wiki. It is a not for profit educational site and there are no advertisements unless incidentally added at the end of an educational video which was uploaded from You Tube. Videos and PowerPoints have links located at the bottom of each page. The main texts, articles, and publications utilized are referenced on the main page and then separately on additional pages. This wiki is constantly being updated with references being added and refined each day. This wiki is in no way intended to be used for diagnostic purposes and in no way substitutes for care from a trained medical professional.

© 2011 Deanna Bland Hiott. All rights reserved
This wiki is updated weekly
Last update 07/24/15

This wiki has been recognized as a nursing wiki of note by Webicina.com



Nurses are Awesome!!!



Objectives:

At the conclusion of Nursing Class the students will:


1. Verbalize an understanding of the unique developmental, physical and emotional needs of the pediatric patient.

2. Know the terms associated with the various pediatric disease processes, congenital abnormalities, treatment interventions and nursing care.

3. Comprehend the scientific principles underlying the disease processes or malformations specific to the pediatric patient.

4. Formulate nursing diagnoses with subsequent nursing interventions for the pediatric patient and family.

5. Develop a plan of care which moves the patient and family toward a satisfactory outcome.

6. Demonstrate collaboration in utilizing the nursing process to develop a plan of care relevant to the case study.

7. Synthesize the information and present the case study to the remainder of the class as a group.

Pediatric Nurses are really awesome!!!




If you still don't realize how needed you are watch this...





References for this site in general (Other references noted as utilized on specific unit pages):

Bryant, R. (2009). Chapter 26: The child with hematologic or immunologic dysfunction. In M. J. Hockenberry & D. Wilson (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (8th ed., pp. 911-948). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Children's Hospital Boston (2010). Hydronephrosis. Retrieved March 13, 2010, from http://www.childrenshospital.org/az/Site1117/mainpageS1117P0.html

Daigneau, C. V. (2005). The child with gastrointestinal dysfunction. In M. Hockenberry, D. Wilson & M. Winkelstein (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (7th ed., pp. 839-889). St. Louis, Missouri: Elsevier Mosby.

Diggle, L. (2007). Injection technique for immunization. Practice Nurse, 33(1), 34-37. Retrieved from http://mendel.csuniv.edu/login?url=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=hch&AN=23790461&site=ehost-live

Ellett, M. L. (2009). Chapter 24: The child with gastrointestinal dysfunction. In M. J. Hockenberry & D. Wilson (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (8th ed., pp. 813-860). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Hinds, M. M., Hyland, J. R., Lovric, A., Nibert, A., & Upchurch, S. (Eds.). (2011). HESI comprehensive review for the NCLEX-RN examination (3rd ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Inc.

Hockenberry, M. J., & Wilson, D. (2009). Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Hockenberry, M. J. (2009). Chapter 28: The child with cerebral dysfunction. In M. J. Hockenberry & D. Wilson (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (8th ed., pp. 974-1022). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Hockenberry, M. J. (2009). Chapter 29: The child with endocrine dysfunction. In M. J. Hockenberry & D. Wilson (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (2009 ed., pp. 1023-1059). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Hunter, J. (2007). Intramuscular injection techniques. Nursing Standards, 22(24), 35-40. Retrieved n.d. from Retrieved from EBSCOhost. Retrieved from http://mendel.csuniv.edu/login?url=http:search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=rzh&AN=2009815670&site=ehost-live

Ipp, M., Taddio, A., Sam, J., Gladbach, M., & Parkin, P. (2007). Vaccine-related pain: Randomised controlled trial of two injection techniques. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 92, 1105-1108. doi:10.1136/adc.2007.118695

Montagnino, B. A., & Ring, P. A. (2009). Chapter 27: The child with genitourinary dysfunction. In M. J. Hockenberry & D. Wilson (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (8th ed., pp. 949-973). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Montagnino, B., & Currier, H. (2005). The child with gentourinary dysfunction. In M. Hockenberry, D. Wilson & M. Winkelstein (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (7th ed., pp. 984-1010). St. Louis, Missouri: Elsevier Mosby.

O'Brien, P., & Baker, A. L. (2009). Chapter 25: The child with cardiovascular dysfunction. In M. J. Hockberry & D. Wilson (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (8th ed., pp. 861-910). St. Louis, MO: Mosby Elsevier.

Potts, N. L., & Mandleco, B. L. (2012). Pediatric nursing: Caring for children and their families (3rd ed.). New York, NY: Delmar Cengage Learning.

STTI International Nursing Research Congress (2009). To apirate or not to aspirate that is the question: An integrative review of the evidence [PowerPoint slides]. Retrieved April 3, 2011, from http://www.stti.iupui.edu/pp07/vancouver09/41810.Crawford,%20Cecelia%20L.-F%2010.pdf

U. S. National Library Of Medicine (2011, June 9). PubMed Health: Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Retrieved November 27, 2011, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001677/

Web MD (2012). MedicineNet, Inc. Retrieved from http://medicinenet.com

Wilson, D. (2005). The child with musculoskeletal or articular dysfunction. In M Hockenberry, D. Wilson & M. Winkelstein (Eds.), Wong's essentials of pediatric nursing (7th ed., pp. 1147-1186). St. Louis, Missouri: Elsevier Mosby.

Pediatric video -
http://youtu.be/hTgA1gubTz4

Johnson and Johnson Nursing 1
http://youtu.be/6jSHijyznyM

Johnson and Johnson - Pediatric Nursing
http://youtu.be/8E0xXa4FDfg

Johnson and Johnson - Pediatric Nursing
http://youtu.be/iz06pmGlaHI